POSTED: May 09 2016
GLASSDOOR SURVEY FINDS 3 IN 5 U.S. EMPLOYEES DID NOT NEGOTIATE PAY IN CURRENT/MOST RECENT JOB – FEWER WOMEN NEGOTIATE THAN MEN

GLASSDOOR SURVEY FINDS 3 IN 5 U.S. EMPLOYEES DID NOT NEGOTIATE PAY IN CURRENT/MOST RECENT JOB – FEWER WOMEN NEGOTIATE THAN MEN

Glassdoor®, has released the results of their Salary Negotiation Insights Survey revealing salary negotiation is not as common as one might think. Close to three in five (59 percent) of U.S. employees accepted the salary they were first offered at their current/most recent job, and did not negotiate. Women are far less likely to negotiate than men. Among employees, more than two-thirds (68 percent) of women accepted the salary they were offered and did not negotiate compared to 52 percent of men.

The survey, conducted online by Harris Poll of 2,015 American adults 18 and older, revealed that only one in 10 (10 percent) of U.S. employees report they successfully gained more money in their salary negotiations, in their current or most recent job. Men were more than three times more likely than women to be successful in negotiating greater pay. Among U.S. employees, 15 percent of men reported their salary negotiations for their current or most recent job resulted in more money compared to just 4 percent of women.

The survey also revealed that older workers (aged 45-54) negotiated their salary less than younger workers. 66 percent of those aged 45-54 accepted their initial salary offer without negotiation, compared to 55 percent of those 35-44, and 60 percent of those aged 18-34. Significantly more women aged 45-54 (77 percent) did not negotiate compared to 56 percent of men the same age.

These findings are especially interesting in light of a recent report from Glassdoor Economic Research that reveals the gender pay gap increases with age. While the “adjusted” gender pay gap3 in the U.S. is 5.4 percent, the gender pay gap for younger workers (18-24) is 2.2 percent compared to 10.5 percent for workers over age 55. These new findings substantiate a negotiation gap between men and women that increases with age.

“While we were surprised that the majority of candidates do not negotiate their initial offers, we have confirmed the negotiation gap exists between men and women and this is something employees, managers and employers should pay attention to in hiring and compensation reviews,” said Dawn Lyon, vice president of corporate affairs and chief equal pay advocate at Glassdoor. “Greater salary transparency can illuminate pay gaps that exist at companies and empower people and employers to close them. Employees and candidates can now arm themselves with insights from Glassdoor about how much a specific job title is worth and build their case with data to gain confidence to simply ask for what they deserve.”

Full press release on www.glassdoor.com