UK third most popular expat destination

 

When it comes to the countries sending the most international assignees, the UK comes third.


The UK is the third most popular location in the world for international work, according to research from logistics company Santa Fe Relocation.
The survey of 929 global mobility professionals found that 8% of all global assignments are located in the UK. The only countries with a higher percentage are China (11%) and the US (18%).
Despite the UK voting to leave the EU in 2016, the number of global assignments has increased since last year from 7%. The US also saw a modest rise, up from 16%, while China experienced a small drop from 12%.
When it comes to the countries sending the most assignees overseas the UK came second, providing 9%, a drop from 13% in 2016. Once again the US tops the list, sending 18% of global assignees. Unlike the UK, the US is now sending out more assignees – a rise of two percentage points from 16% in 2016.
Neil Bothams, regional CEO of Santa Fe Relocation, Europe said the findings were positive for the UK. “Despite intense speculation around Britain’s standing in the world these new report findings show Britain is still open for business,” he said. “The UK, which is approximately 20% of the US in population terms, still packs a punch when it comes to global commerce.”
However, Bothams was concerned with the drop in the number of global assignees the UK is sending out. “While the UK remains second place as the largest sending country, the drop from a 13% share to 9% is significant,” he said. “As far as we can determine from the data and speaking to our clients some UK-based companies are utilising other shorter-term approaches, including business traveller solutions, and are more hesitant about committing to long-term assignment programmes.
“The pressure is on global mobility professionals to support their businesses with appropriate solutions to facilitate mobility while much of the uncertainty persists.”

This article was first published on HR Magazine. You can see the original article here.

 
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