Half of “over-active” Brits facing burn-out

 

Leading health insurer Bupa has looked at the importance of taking a break from today’s hectic lifestyle. 

A study by Bupa UK today highlights that an ‘always on’ culture means the 16-hour waking day has evolved into a day of 17.5 hours of activity. In line with Brits’ aim to do more, over half (54%) are now experiencing health problems associated with burn-out such as stress, fatigue, illness or injury.

The research also revealed only 5% of the nation takes time in the day to relax. The majority of people see this time as an opportunity to go on social media, check emails and catch up online. 20 years ago, however, the importance of being idle was more keenly felt with over half of people (60%) taking a break back in 1997.

Dr Luke James, Bupa’s Medical Director for Bupa Health Clinics said: “Keeping busy can make us think we’re being productive in the short term but it can have a noticeable impact on our health in the long term.”

“It’s important to remember to put time aside to rest after a busy day, recover after exercise, or repair after an injury. Many of us look to bloggers as our inspiration, but they too know the significance of time out. We hope by showing this ‘switch-off’ side to their weekly regimes, the times when they are just relaxing on the sofa, reading a book or spending time with their family will encourage others to make time to do the same.”

The average day in numbers:

  • 5 hours working (including working on our commute and from home)
  • 52 mins checking emails
  • 38 minutes reading news via a smart phone or tablet
  • 53 minutes looking at social media / the internet
  • 47 minutes speaking to friends / partners via Whatsapp / text
  • 33 minutes calling friends / partners or family members
  • 34 minutes making plans for the week / weekend
  • 38 minutes on personal admin / paying bills, shopping online
  • 46 minutes exercising
  • 46 minutes socialising

Total = 17 hours 32 minutes.

 

Research was carried out by 1,500 UK working residents in April 2017

You can read the original Bupa article here.

 
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